A charity in England will help victims of illegal dog imports

Paula Ros and her dog Tallulah.

A DOG lover from South Tyneside, caught up in an illegal imported animal scam, is aiming to launch a charity to help other victims.

Paula Ros paid £700 for a French bulldog puppy, which she believed had been bred in England.

However, the dog was later traced to Lithuania, and now she is trying to help others hit by the growing problem of illegally-imported animals.

Miss Ros, 23, of Australia Grove, South Shields, has paid more than £500 to have her French bulldog, Tallulah, put into quarantine.

She said: “Thankfully, Tallulah is fine and I hope to get her out in a few weeks.

“But there must be lots of other people caught up in my situation and some of them will struggle to pay quarantine bills.

“I want to help others who have bought French bulldogs and am trying to get a registered charity number.

“I plan to call the charity, For the Love of Frenchies.”

Miss Ros bought Tallulah after travelling to Manchester, but failed to obtain the correct documentation.

A microchip in the dog’s neck later revealed the animal had been bred in Lithuania, not the UK.

The case sparked a warning from South Tyneside Council, which has highlighted the dangers of diseases from illegally-imported cats and dogs.

Miss Ros added: “There is a high demand for French bulldogs and I would like to get a few hundred people involved in the charity.

“I already have a presence on the internet and people can simply look for ‘For the Love of Frenchies’ on Facebook.”

A council spokesman has urged dog lovers to only pets from a reputable dealer and to examine documents before any sale.

This story was produced by the South Shields, England newspaper, The Fields Gazette

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Top 10 Dog Toxins of 2013

Many frenchie owners use or have used #4 and #9. We recommend you talk to your vet about any concerns you may have.

  1. Chocolate: Dark equals dangerous! Bakers and dark chocolate are the most toxic, and milk chocolate if ingested in large amounts.
  2. Xylitol: This sweetener found in sugarless chewing gum and candy, medications and nasal sprays causes a rapid drop in blood sugar and liver failure only in dogs (not cats).
  3. NSAIDs: Ibuprofen, naproxen, etc., found in products like Advil, Motrin, and Aleve. Dogs don’t metabolize these drugs well; ingestions result in stomach ulcers and kidney failure.
  4. Over the counter cough, cold and allergy medications: Those that contain acetaminophen or decongestants, such as pseudoephedrine or phenylephrine, are particularly toxic.
  5. Rodenticides (mouse poison): These may cause internal bleeding (brodifacoum, bromadiolone, etc.) or brain swelling (bromethalin), even in small amounts.
  6. Grapes and raisins: These harmless human foods cause kidney damage in dogs.
  7. Insect bait stations: These rarely cause poisoning in dogs – the bigger risk is bowel obstruction when dogs swallow the plastic casing.
  8. Prescription ADD/ADHD medications: These amphetamines such as Adderall, Concerta, Dexedrine, and Vyvanse can cause tremors, seizures, cardiac problems and death in pets.
  9. Glucosamine joint supplements: Overdose of tasty products such as Cosequin and Move Free typically only cause diarrhea; however, in rare cases, liver failure can develop.
  10. Silica gel packets and oxygen absorbers: Silica gel packs, found in new shoes, purses or backpacks, is rarely a concern. The real threats are the iron-containing oxygen absorbers found in food packages like beef jerky or pet treats, which can cause iron poisoning.

Read the full article here.

New webmaster, new address, new look!

Hi everyone, my name is Jeff Hanneson, and I am the new webmaster here at the FBDCA. I am excited to announce that the website will be getting a much needed face lift. First and foremost, following in line with a majority of other AKC breed sites, the website has a new address – www.FBDCA.org – and our old website frenchbulldogclub.org will soon forward to this new address. Secondly, there is a massive amount of information and pages that have been created on the old website. If you know of a page that you believe needs to be available to site visitors, please email me with that information. If there are pages or information that you would like to save, please do so as soon as possible.

I look forward to your comments on the new site.

Thank you,